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What is ASBDA

A BALANCED CURRICULUM FOR BAND

There are a number of band programs throughout the country which have been sacrificial lambs, the Accountability, Back-to-Basics and No Child Left Behind exponents is ample testimony that bands have not achieved curricular status in the minds of many school boards and superintendents' staffs. The cause for official board actions which have resulted in the reduction of services or the complete elimination of a band program is generally attributable to a lack of understanding of, and appreciation for, the educational processes which are involved in the metamorphosis which occurs between the first exposure to a new piece of music to the final performance. The decisions-makers, therefore, have not looked upon the band as a curricular subject, but as an activity which has enhanced the public relations image for the school system, but is expendable in times of stress.

One of the great challenges which band directors, and their administrators, have had to face when they began to be scheduled as a class during the class day, has been that of establishing and maintaining a curriculum which would meet the needs of the student, the school, and the community it serves. Because the band, particularly at the high school level, functions well in all three of these desirable requirements, its problems are somewhat unique in the public school curricular hierarchy. One would assume that when a school board and the superintendent placed band in the school schedule and provided a specialized space for the instruction to take place that they would also provide the administrative and budgetary support necessary to achieve the goals and objectives of the program. This latter condition, however, has not been a universal characteristic of school systems because in too many instances, priorities had not been established which clearly outlined for the teacher, the administrator and the public where the greatest and the least importance would be placed for all classes and activities. Too many band directors have been content to allow this condition to prevail because they thought their field of endeavor was "special" and there would be no need to communicate in terms of a band curriculum.

With the exception of a minority of systems, bands have not received complete budgetary support for either the instructional program or their PR activities. The result has been the development of the band parent support groups which have assisted the financial support of the system's music program. This, and other aspects of the total program have resulted in some pressures which have caused some directors and administrators to over-emphasize the PR aspect of the band, with a resulting diminution of time and effort being exerted for the curricular aspects of the program. Primary responsibility for curriculum development and the cummunication of the program's aims and objectives is that of the trained music educator, the band director, who cannot ever assume that the decision maker(s) to whom he/she must relate have either an empathy for, or sufficient knowledge of, a band program to make decisions without his/her input.

It is the opinion of ASBDA that the concert band in the band program is the fundamental reason for being in the curriculum at all levels,. In the beginning stages, band classes should be structured as primarily instructional. They should give the students a sound program of instruction in basic techniques, music fundamentals and musical concepts. At this level, performance should be minimal and limited to demonstration programs for fellow students and parents. As the program progresses to the Middle School/Jr. High Level, the instructional program should continue to be the primary objective of class activity. As organized bands become the typical class format,more provision is made for public performance. Small ensembles which augment instruction in basic fundamentals for woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments are encouraged. Larger ensembles such as the marching band, and jazz bands are spin-offs from the concert band. At the high school level the problem of maintaining a balance between instruction and PR activities becomes especially acute if the curricular priorities have not been established and agreed upon by all concerned. The high school band is unique, even within the school music department, because of its unusual ability and facility to provide special services to the school and community. Band directors should always keep their program in focus and remember that the concert band is the core for their curriculum. Other performing groups such as the marching band and the jazz band are essential in providing services and as an opportunity to expose high school performers to other media of performance. They should not, however, be allowed to assume a role of more importance to that of the concert band. If this occurs the band program loses its viability as an element in the system's curricula. The band director must be responsible for establishing and maintaining musical standards and for communicating his/her curriculum to the decision-maker of his/her school system, as well as to the students, the school and community which he/she serves.

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DALE C. HARRIS
First President
The formal organization of the American School Band Directors Association, Inc., took place at the First Annual Convention held in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on November 21-22, 1953. The first national organizing committee was comprised of three members, the late Louis M. Blaha of Illinois, James C. Harper of North Carolina and Dale C. Harris of Michigan. George W. Patrick, Illinois, at his own request, was not listed as a member of the original organizing committee although he attended each of the meetings held in Chicago prior to the Cedar Rapids convention and was at all times a tireless worker in the interest of the Association. The purpose of this committee was to ascertain if there was a sufficient interest and desire among school band men for an organization on a nationwide level to justify the founding of a national association. The response was such that the national organizing committee was expanded to include Earl Pat Arsers of Texas, Robert W. Dean of Iowa, Al Wright of Florida and George W. Patrick of Illinois. It was then definitely decided to hold a convention for the purpose of organizing a national association.

There were many other school band men besides those on the national organizing committee who gave unstintingly of their time and effort to help bring the American School Band Directors Association, Inc., into being. Without their interest and endeavors, the Cedar Rapids organizing convention would not have been possible.

In this organizational phase great impetus was given to the movement by the wholehearted interest and support of conductors of professional and college bands. Dr. Edwin Franko Goldman, Founder and Honorary Life President of the American Bandmasters Association, wrote a warm letter of endorsement and maintained an active interest in the development of our new Association until his death in February, 1956. Dr. A. Austin Harding. Director Emeritus of the University of Illinois Bands, was another ardent supporter of the newly organized school band directors' group. He not only stood loyally by with expert advice and counsel, but encouraged the group throughout the organization process. Almost without exception, college bandmen throughout the nation were also encouraging and gave very practical and valuable assistance in recommending school band men in their states who would be qualified for membership in the American School Band Directors Association.

During the early years of the Association's span of existence, much time by necessity had to be spent on organization and membership activity. At present the broad generalities of the objectives for which the group was organized are now being, or for the most part have been, translated into actualities. Besides the wholesome professional opportunities for exchange of professional ideas, the major function of the Association is now focused on a continuing and comprehensive program for the improvement of school bands. Many phases of public school instrumental music are under serious study, including such items as budgets, physical facilities, instrumental schedules, visual aids, instrumental methods, solo and ensemble material, acoustical research and others.

Since the first convention held in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 1953, other conventions have been held throughout the United States. At these gatherings, programs of extremely high standards were presented which have served to advance the stature of this organization of school band directors.

From a very modest beginning when fourteen states were represented in the membership, it has now grown to include all fifty states and Canada and one thousand active and affiliate members, and a strong supporting group of associate members numbering over one hundred. The latter group represents music industries, music publishing firms and allied interests, and is a clear indication that the American School Band Directors Association, Inc. is recognized as a wholesome constructive force in school instrumental music. Continued success will be assured if we hold firmly to the original ideals and objectives which brought the Association into existence.

DALE C. HARRIS, First President

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COLORADO
Lloyd Jensen, Sterling
Edward A. Kehn, Boulder
Roland S. Roberts, Denver
Byron E. Syring, Monte Vista

GEORGIA
John T. Lee, Columbus

ILLINOIS
Ernest O. Caneva, Lockport
Lynn Huffman, Belvidere
F.C. Kreider, Collinsville
Karl H. Kibitz, Freeport
Charles H. Loomis, Ccntralia
Louis E. Meek, Granite City
Chalon B. Nesler, Herrin
George W. Patrick, Springfield
LaVerne R. Reimer, Elmhurst
C.J. Shoemaker, Downers
Grove George C. Wall Glen Ellyn
F.J. Woodman, Dunlay

INDIANA
Larry Johnston, Evansville
John D. Melton, Hammond
Carlye J. Snider, Whiting
Al Stodden, Fort Wayne
Fred Weber, Michigan City
IOWA
R. Cedric Anderson, Cedar Rapids
Paul Behm, Mason City
Robert W. Dean, Spencer
Melvin Hill, Washington
Ivan Kennedy, Oskaloosa
Richard Simpson, Red Oak


MlCHIGAN
Harry Begian, Detroit
Mac E. Carr, River Rouge
Dale C. Harris, Pontiac
Charles W. Hills, Jr., Fowlerville
Robert Lint, HilIsdaIe
Stanley Shoemaker, Jackson
William Stewart. Muskegon
Fred N. Wiest, Pontiac



MINNESOTA
John E. Berg, Truman
Butler Eitel, Edina
Earl Ericson, St. Peter
HL. Lidstrom, Rochester
Gera1d Niemeyer, Worthington
Allen J. Opland, Pipestone
Lloyd F. Swartley, Duluth
NEBRASKA
William Kelly, McCook
Robert Lute, Oakland
Ralph Salyard, Bandelman
James Sewrey, lmperial

NEW YORK
Dean L. Harrington, Hornell

OHIO
John Farrinaci, Cleveland Heights
George T00t, Carrollton
Kaarlo Mackey, Conneaut
Howard Pardee, Salem
Emil W. Puffenberger, Canal Fulton
Walter M. Sells, Fremont

OKLAHOMA
William C. Robinson, Norman

TENNESSEE
V.C. Adcock, Newport
Wilkse S. Bobbitt, Erwin

TEXAS
Earl Pat Arsers, San Antonio

WYOMING
Morine Nyquist, Reliance

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Exceptional contributions have been made to the school band movement by a number of individuals whose careers have not included extensive teaching in the fields of grade, junior and senior high school bands in the schools. The A. Austin Harding Award is presented to these individuals for valuable and dedicated service to the bands of America as a measure of ASBDA's esteem, appreciation, and respect for their outstanding personal contribution to the school band movement.


AUSTIN HARDING AWARD RECIPIENTS
1980 Leonard Falcone 1992 Dr. Alfred Reed
1981 Dr. Donald McGinnis 1993 Commander Allen E. Beck
  Col. Arnald D. Gabriel 1994 Kenneth G. Bloomquist
1982 Lt. Col. William F. Santleman 1995 Herbert L. Carter
  Lt. Col. Gilbert Mitchell 1996 Col. John R. Bourgeois
1983 Dr. Lucien Calliet 1997 Vincent McBryde
1984 Dr. Merton Utgaard 1998 Frank Erickson
1985 Dr. Frederick Fennell 1999 C.H. Duncan
1987 Walter E. Volkwein 2000 Major Herbert L. Day
1988 John P. Paynter 2001 Mrs. Dorothea Dean
1989 Donald Hunsberger 2002 Richard L. Floyd
1990 Paul E. Bierley 2003 Himie Voxman
1991 Col. Eugene W. Allen 2004 Eugene M. Corporan



Exceptional contributions have been made to the school band movement by a number of individuals whose careers have not included extensive teaching in the fields of grade, junior and senior high school bands in the schools. The A. Austin Harding Award is presented to these individuals for valuable and dedicated service to the bands of America as a measure of ASBDA's esteem, appreciation, and respect for their outstanding personal contribution to the school band movement.

EDWARD FRANKO GOLDMAN AWARD RECIPIENTS
1964
Capt. James Harper
ASBDA
1985
Sidney R. Rosen
ASBDA
 
Dr. Harold Bachman
non-ASBDA
 
H. Robert Reynolds
non-ASBDA
1965
Dr. Dale C. Harris
ASBDA
1986
Warren A. Felts
ASBDA
 
Dr. Frank Simon
non-ASBDA
 
Nilo W. Hovey
non-ASBDA
1966
Forrest L. McAllister
ASBDA
1987
Alvin E. Bohms
ASBDA
1967
Earl Pat Arsers
ASBDA
 
Harry J. Wenger
non-ASBDA
 
Carlton Stewart
non-ASBDA
1988
Ross A. Leeper
ASBDA
1968
Arthur H. Brandenburg
ASBDA
 
Earl A. Slocum
non-ASBDA
 
Dr. William D. Revelli
non-ASBDA
1989
James F. Herendeen
ASBDA
1969
Robert W. Dean
ASBDA
 
Frank L. Battisti
non-ASBDA
 
Frederick C. Ebbs
non-ASBDA
1990
Homer F. Haworth
ASBDA
1970
Emil W. Puffenberger
ASBDA
1991
Everett L. Roberts
ASBDA
 
Dr. Paul Yoder
non-ASBDA
1992
Jay W. Burchak
ASBDA
 
Karl L. King
non-ASBDA
 
Clare Grundman
non-ASBDA
 
Glenn Cliff Bainum
non-ASBDA
1993
Saburo Watanabe
ASBDA
1971
George W. Patrick
ASBDA
 
Dr. Frank Bencriscutto
non-ASBDA
1972
Mac E. Carr
ASBDA
1994
David G. Reul
ASBDA
1973
Philip J. Fuller
ASBDA
 
Timothy Broege
non-ASBDA
 
Mark H. Hindsley
non-ASBDA
1995
William C. Robinson
ASBDA
1974
Seymour Okun
ASBDA
1996
Henry P. Vander Linde
ASBDA
1975
C. Sidney Berg
ASBDA
1997
James J. Hewitt
ASBDA
 
Dr. Clarence Sawhill
non-ASBDA
1998
Howard O. (Doc) Pardee
ASBDA
1976
Ernest Caneva
ASBDA
1999
Joe E. Foster, Sr.
ASBDA
1977
J. Raymond Brandon
ASBDA
2000
Ray B. Haney
ASBDA
1978
Dr. Harry Begian
ASBDA
 
Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser
non-ASBDA
 
Frank Piersol
non-ASBDA
2001
Edgar Q. Rooker
ASBDA
1979
James M. Tibbs
ASBDA
 
John L. Whitwell
non-ASBDA
1980
James Clark
ASBDA
 
Ray E. Cramer
non-ASBDA
1981
Arnold Berndt
ASBDA
2002
Dennis Hanna
ASBDA
 
Mark Kelly
non-ASBDA
2003
James A. Sewrey
ASBDA
1982
Howard L. Lidstrom
ASBDA
2004
Lloyd Nakahara
ASBDA
 
Roy M. Martin
non-ASBDA
 
Jack Pierson
ASBDA
1983
Edward A. Kehn
ASBDA
 
 
 
 
W. Francis McBeth
non-ASBDA
 
 
 
1984
Lawrence E. Griffin
ASBDA
 
 
 
 
Clarence Glen Arsers
non-ASBDA
 
 
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